Southwestern Sunflower
PAGE 2 of 3

 

License to Build

I like the "old school" license plates.  It used to be that each state basically had one simple plate motif.  They were always stamped instead of screened, and usually two-tone, with bold, contrasting colors.  For example, for most of my childhood, Washington had a white plate with green writing; and before that it was dark green with white writing.  Nowdays, you have 30 different themed plates with a bunch of snazzy logos, and most of them look like cartoons.  Did I mention that I was the nostalgic type?

The irony of my grand idea was that I was going to need to acquire more license plates, and would only be able to use 3 of the plates that I already had.  Not much progress toward my goal of reducing the stockpile.  This is where those masters of the cyber flea market known as eBay come in.  Now the project was going to start costing me money.

I needed very specific old-style plates because I needed specific colors -- green, yellow, and brownish.  Coincidentally, the plates best-suited to meet that need all come from the Four Corners area of the Southwest.  The green plate would be Colorado, the yellow plate would be New Mexico, and the brownish (maroon) plate would be Arizona.  Even more specifically, the New Mexico plates would have to be a certain small set of years when both the motto -- "Land of Enchantment", and the state name were at the bottom where they would be seen better in my final product.  These plates were from about 1977-1982.  Amazingly, all can be found on the Bay with ease.  There are people selling everything on there.  It took about 2 months to find, buy, and receive all the material I needed.

Here are the old and the new.  Which style of plates do you like best???  I'm probably the only one that prefers the old ones, but I'm used to being the oddball.....

 

Mantown

Mantown is where the tools and the toys are kept.  It's where the real work gets done.  I guess mine is "Mantown Lite" when compared to it's inspiration and namesake at my friend Heather's place in Plymouth, Massachusetts.  That, is a shop.  Mantown is where Southwestern Sunflower would grow and bloom.

My art piece needed a canvas.  That's where Angie's gate came in.  The planks were a little bit warped, but overall they were in good shape.  Using a high-tech level-and-plumb device known as the "garage wall", I aligned and bound five of the standard planks that would result in a canvas of roughly 30 inches wide by 70 inches tall..... 

 

Well the thing didn't sit quite as level as it was supposed to, so a little needed to be trimmed off the bottom.  Here, you will observe another highly technical piece of equipment we have at Mantown called a "sawhorse".....

 

Mounting hardware was attached to the top back brace so that the final piece could be hung on a wall.  Once again you see yet another finely-engineered implement known as the "human vise"; and beside it, a little "human vice"..... 

 

Now that the canvas was prepared, it was time to move on to the license plates that were accumulating in the mailbox.  Measurements were taken... calculations were made... lines and curves were drawn.  Then Adam got to work with the jigsaw at his ergonomic, OSHA-approved workstation; which provides the highest standards of safety, efficiency, and comfort.....

 

PAGE 1  |  PAGE 3